Category Archives: Author Posts

Articles written by OBP authors on their books. Accessible and interesting these posts are well worth a read for those wishing to understand more about the great range of subjects we work with.

Ownership and Cultural Heritage

This free to read book grew out of discussions about how multimedia technologies afforded scholars new ways of sharing documentation and scientific knowledge with the cultural owners of these collected oral genres. Funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), the project had two distinct and overarching goals: Continue reading

Strengthening Democracy Through Open Education

This blog post was originally published by Patrick Blessinger as an article on University World News – you can access it here.

Open Education: International Perspectives in Higher Education can be read and downloaded for free here.

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Security in a small nation? Events, dear boy, events…

I’m not sure if it’s apocryphal or not, but Harold Macmillan supposedly once claimed that what politicians in government fear most is “events, dear boy, events”. For the academic, the publication of a long-gestated project can hold similar trepidation. The ‘thing’ that you set out to study can, in the rear view mirror, seem distant and irrelevant; overtaken by the ‘next big thing’. Security in a Small Nation does not suffer from such problems. On the day that I sat to write this blog a debate in the Scottish Parliament on a second independence referendum was cut short due to a terrorist attack on the Westminster Parliament and the surrounding area. That Security in a Small Nation, published only days earlier, is sub-titled Scotland, Democracy, Politics, seemed eerily and entirely relevant in this context. Continue reading

Behaviour, Development and Evolution – an Introductory Blog (1/3)

The Appearance of Design

My book touches on many aspects of human nature.  However, I regard the nature/nurture dichotomy as false.  Nature refers to the end products of development and nurture to how they got there.  The innate/learned, robust/plastic, hard-wired/soft-wired, and genetic/environmental dichotomies all incorrectly imply that human characteristics come in two forms.  Continue reading

Behaviour, Development and Evolution – an Introductory Blog (2/3)

The Importance of Adaptation

From an early stage in its life each individual has to deal with many challenges.  When young its ecology may be very different from that of the adult, in which case it may have special adaptations to deal with those conditions. Continue reading

Behaviour, Development and Evolution – an Introductory Blog (3/3)

A Perspective on Humans

My central academic interests have been with the development and evolution of behaviour and I have long been concerned with the relevance of my work to humans.  Continue reading

Behaviour, Development and Evolution – A Q&A with Sir Patrick Bateson

Q: What would you say is the central concern of Behaviour, Development and Evolution?

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Wallenstein: A Dramatic Poem – A Q&A with Flora Kimmich

Q: How did translating Wallenstein: A Dramatic Poem compare to your first translation with OBP, Fiesco’s Conspiracy at Genoa? Continue reading

Trump and the Trillion Dollar Infrastructure Finance Challenge

On 9th November, after his victory in the American Presidential election, Donald walter-front-cover-biggerTrump declared, “We are going to fix our inner cities and rebuild our highways, bridges, tunnels, airports, schools, hospitals. We’re going to rebuild our infrastructure, which will become, by the way, second to none.”

His eyecatching pledge to spend one trillion dollars on infrastructure projects over ten years has raised an important issue: how will this be financed? Trump has proposed ideas such as public-private partnerships and a “deficit-neutral system of infrastructure tax credits” to encourage private investment. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi has signalled support for infrastructure investment, but she has also noted that, “on Capitol Hill, the divide is always over how to pay for it.” Continue reading

Latin Love

Turpin-front-coverI chose to focus on Amores (Book I) because Ovid’s text seems particularly suitable for students at that crucial stage when they have learned the basics of Latin and are just starting on real Latin authors.  In some ways it is easiest to make the transition by means of a prose author, and Bret Mulligan’s new edition of Nepos’ Life of Hannibal (also published by Open Book Publishers) is an obvious choice.  But students and teachers are often impatient to get to the poetry.   They typically begin with Catullus, but soon find themselves looking for more, and the Amores are an obvious choice, since the poems are fairly short and since Ovid’s Latin is relatively easy, or at least as easy as Latin poetry ever gets. Continue reading