Category Archives: Author Posts

Articles written by OBP authors on their books. Accessible and interesting these posts are well worth a read for those wishing to understand more about the great range of subjects we work with.

Behaviour, Development and Evolution – an Introductory Blog (1/3)

The Appearance of Design

My book touches on many aspects of human nature.  However, I regard the nature/nurture dichotomy as false.  Nature refers to the end products of development and nurture to how they got there.  The innate/learned, robust/plastic, hard-wired/soft-wired, and genetic/environmental dichotomies all incorrectly imply that human characteristics come in two forms.  Continue reading

Behaviour, Development and Evolution – an Introductory Blog (2/3)

The Importance of Adaptation

From an early stage in its life each individual has to deal with many challenges.  When young its ecology may be very different from that of the adult, in which case it may have special adaptations to deal with those conditions. Continue reading

Behaviour, Development and Evolution – an Introductory Blog (3/3)

A Perspective on Humans

My central academic interests have been with the development and evolution of behaviour and I have long been concerned with the relevance of my work to humans.  Continue reading

Behaviour, Development and Evolution – A Q&A with Sir Patrick Bateson

Q: What would you say is the central concern of Behaviour, Development and Evolution?

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Wallenstein: A Dramatic Poem – A Q&A with Flora Kimmich

Q: How did translating Wallenstein: A Dramatic Poem compare to your first translation with OBP, Fiesco’s Conspiracy at Genoa? Continue reading

Trump and the Trillion Dollar Infrastructure Finance Challenge

On 9th November, after his victory in the American Presidential election, Donald walter-front-cover-biggerTrump declared, “We are going to fix our inner cities and rebuild our highways, bridges, tunnels, airports, schools, hospitals. We’re going to rebuild our infrastructure, which will become, by the way, second to none.”

His eyecatching pledge to spend one trillion dollars on infrastructure projects over ten years has raised an important issue: how will this be financed? Trump has proposed ideas such as public-private partnerships and a “deficit-neutral system of infrastructure tax credits” to encourage private investment. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi has signalled support for infrastructure investment, but she has also noted that, “on Capitol Hill, the divide is always over how to pay for it.” Continue reading

Latin Love

Turpin-front-coverI chose to focus on Amores (Book I) because Ovid’s text seems particularly suitable for students at that crucial stage when they have learned the basics of Latin and are just starting on real Latin authors.  In some ways it is easiest to make the transition by means of a prose author, and Bret Mulligan’s new edition of Nepos’ Life of Hannibal (also published by Open Book Publishers) is an obvious choice.  But students and teachers are often impatient to get to the poetry.   They typically begin with Catullus, but soon find themselves looking for more, and the Amores are an obvious choice, since the poems are fairly short and since Ovid’s Latin is relatively easy, or at least as easy as Latin poetry ever gets. Continue reading

Interdisciplinary Diderot

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Denis Diderot (1713-1784) was a mathematician, a major art critic, an innovative novelist, a playwright, and, of course, the editor of the Encyclopédie, which contained articles on most subjects under the sun: science, medicine, the arts, horse-breeding, ship-building… It is a fascinating, not to say enlightening, exercise to approach the interdisciplinary Diderot in an interdisciplinary fashion. I am involved, as an editor, in just such a project.

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In Honour of Professor Robert Rennie

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In 2014, Robert Rennie retired from the post he had held since 1994 as Professor of Conveyancing at the University of Glasgow. This brought an end to part – but only part – of a remarkable career encompassing both academia and legal practice. Robert qualified as a solicitor in 1969, having previously studied at the University of Glasgow, completing a part-time PhD thesis on Floating Charges – A Treatise from the Standpoint of Scots Law in 1972. He worked as a solicitor in the west of Scotland, where he played a leading role in the expansion of the firm of Ballantyne and Copland, and was appointed to the part-time Chair of Conveyancing at Glasgow in 1994.
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How I Came Home

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For most of my professional career I was a teacher of French literature and much of my published work has been in that field. But I have always been a wanderer and, since my retirement in 1999, perhaps a rather reckless one. Sometimes I look back to see if I can discern any consistency in my seemingly random curiosity and research projects. Continue reading