Accessible Open Access and Information Resources on Disability and Human Rights

Why Accessible Open Access? Well, in principle … And why not?logo_header_cem

By the year 2017 it will have been 15 years since the Budapest initiative for Open Access. Various initiatives downloadhave since been taken, such as the Bethesda Declaration on Open Access in 2003, the Berlin Declaration on Open Access  and even IFLA’s adherence to the declaration Of Berlin, in 2011.

Since 2002, the world has worked hard for open access as a way of managing knowledge and the right of access to information for all, in an editorial world that is capably restrictive.

So far, we have discussed free access to information for all; but “all” has not been defined. Continue reading

Trump and the Trillion Dollar Infrastructure Finance Challenge

On 9th November, after his victory in the American Presidential election, Donald walter-front-cover-biggerTrump declared, “We are going to fix our inner cities and rebuild our highways, bridges, tunnels, airports, schools, hospitals. We’re going to rebuild our infrastructure, which will become, by the way, second to none.”

His eyecatching pledge to spend one trillion dollars on infrastructure projects over ten years has raised an important issue: how will this be financed? Trump has proposed ideas such as public-private partnerships and a “deficit-neutral system of infrastructure tax credits” to encourage private investment. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi has signalled support for infrastructure investment, but she has also noted that, “on Capitol Hill, the divide is always over how to pay for it.” Continue reading

Open Access Books and the Need to Catch Up

downloadI want to like e-books, I really do. I like the idea that I can access my book anywhere I am, from any device I happen to be using at the time. I own a Kindle and for books that are available on the Kindle, this is the case: I can use my phone, my tablet or my Kindle and the reading experience is pretty much the same. The problem is that academic books haven’t really caught up. There are too many different platforms and too many different access models. As a former e-resources librarian I had to grapple with this on many occasions. For our students this is a barrier, they don’t understand why they can’t download the e-book to their device and access it when they want or why if someone else is in a particular e-book they have to wait and I can kind of see where they are coming from. Continue reading

Libraries and Open Access – The December Series

dec-seriesFor Open Access Week 2016, OBP published a series of blog posts by librarians, in which they shared their thoughts on Open Access books – all the blog posts can be read here.

But we didn’t want the conversation to end there!

We are releasing a follow up December Series of Libraries and Open Access, and we’d love it if you participated!

The blog post would preferably consist of around 500-700 words, discussing your thoughts on Open Access books – it doesn’t matter what your role within the library is, or the angle that you come at the post from; we just want to hear your experiences!

If you’d like to participate let us know asap, and please send your blog post and a picture of yourself to libraries@openbookpublishers.com by 01/12/2016. Of course don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions.

The Monograph Crisis: Open Access for Art and Design Scholarship

Electronic monographs are not as straightforward as journals. As a librarian assisting students in their research, ebooks don’t come up as frequently and wocad_university_logohen they do it usually involves resolving issues that come with difficult user interfaces. Disparate platforms and constricting digital rights management (DRM) result in poor usability of scholarly ebooks. Nearly all journal articles come to us in neat and tidy pdf form but monographs have pdf, epub, and wide range of proprietary formats. This lack of standardization can complicate ebooks and it is for this reason that I feel open access is the ideal publishing model for scholarly ebooks. It solves both challenges. Continue reading

On why we should Love Open Access Books; a UK Librarian’s Perspective.

logoMany librarians in the UK (and as a profession, librarians have a long standing tradition of Open Access advocacy) find it galling that the term ‘ Open Access’ is increasingly met with either a stifled yawn or a rant about the inequities of article processing charges, publisher profits and the bureaucratic hoops that academic staff are expected to jump through to meet funder mandates.  This response is also true of some librarians. Continue reading

Open Access books? I Thought OA was for Journals!

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“I thought open access was about academic journals – why are you talking about books?” This is a common refrain that I hear when begin talking about the importance of open access books, one that I myself made not long ago, and I suspect this remains the case for many other librarians as well. This open access week, while my colleagues continue to market and educate our researchers, I wanted to take a moment to reflect on how we – the OA educators, or alternatively, “those librarians asking more of us!” – are learning about open access. Continue reading

Digital Scholarship, Networked Scholarship, and Other Side Effects of Open

113-r3iysl7-north-carolina-state-university-red-app-sm[1] As an early-career librarian, I am fortunate to have come into a world of academic libraries that already values Open Access. I learned about open access in my courses and discussed it at length with my peers over coffee in the student lounge at graduate school. I had the opportunity to work as a graduate assistant with librarians at the University of Toronto, who were doing great work to advance knowledge and practice of Open Access, and I was able to participate in that work. And yet, every time I engaged in one of these conversations, I had a very clear picture in my head: a simple PDF of a journal article. Continue reading

A History of Open Access at The Royal Library of Belgium

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The Royal Library of Belgium : a place of history

The Royal Library of Belgium’s collections have been growing since the XVth century. Throughout its history, from the Library of the Dukes of Bourgogne to the present day, the Royal Library (its official name since 1837) has continuously built its collections by means of valuable acquisitions. With a collection of more than 7 million documents the Royal Library of Belgium (KBR) constitutes the literary and scientific memory of Belgium. Besides collecting Belgian publications through legal deposit, the institution owns materials of great historical and cultural importance. Continue reading

A Few Thoughts about Open Access Books

Electronic books, better known as e-books, first arrived in the early 1970s as wake-forest-logodigital versions of their print counterparts (Loan, 2015).  Since then, they have become an invaluable component of the publishing market as publishers and similar providers have offered e-books to consumers on a variety of platforms.  For academic libraries, electronic books have been a resource to offer specific materials to patrons at their point of need, but there have also been have been concerns about these formats (Mune, 2016).  For instance, providers have used proprietary software that requires additional effort on the part of the user in order to read them.  Also, software could be required for specific devices that could limit how a patron can access a specific item for reading purposes. Continue reading